Search Iowa's political blogs

Google Custom Search

Monday, November 30, 2009

Bleeding Heartland: Iverson may challenge Bailey in House district 9

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Two-term State Representative McKinley Bailey, an Iraq War veteran,
may face a tough Republican challenger next year in Iowa House
district 9. The Des Moines Register reports that Stew Iverson, former
Iowa Senate majority leader and Iowa GOP chairman, is thinking about
running against Bailey. Iverson told the Register that he'll make a
decision "sometime after the first of the year" ... Bailey defeated
Republican incumbent George Eichhorn with nearly 55 percent of the
vote in 2006. He was re-elected with just over 55 percent of the vote
in 2008, even though his district was one of Iowa Republicans' top
targets. Corporate-funded conservative interest groups ran ads against
Bailey and other first-term House Democrats in early 2008 as well as
shortly before the November election. House district 9 includes all of
Wright County, parts of Webster and Hamilton counties, and a tiny
slice of Franklin County.

Labels: ,

John Deeth Blog: Miller-Meeks joins deja vu primary field

Excerpted from this post at John Deeth Blog

It's deja vu on the GOP primary ballot as three of the players from
2008 are facing off in a slightly different configuration in 2010. The
big news over this long holiday weekend (four days with no post is the
longest I've been off the grid in years) is Mariannette Miller-Meeks
announcing her second run at Dave Loebsack. To be honest, I was
expecting MMM to hold off until the map got redrawn. But I was wrong
there, so let's see what else I can be wrong about. Miller-Meeks was a
bit of a surprise winner in the '08 primary. The early frontrunner and
DC favorite was Peter Teahen, but he was greeted by grassroots
loathing as Teahen's donation to 2002 Democratic candidate Julie
Thomas became an issue. (The "donated to Dems" card is getting played
by Vander Plaats in the governor's race, as he points out Terry
Branstad's erstwhile support for Nebraska neighbor Ben Nelson.)

Labels:

The Iowa Republican: Gibbons launches Website

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Jim Gibbons has launched a website for his congressional campaign. The
Gibbons for Congress website is located at www.GibbonsforCongress.com.
Gibbons also announced that Allison Kleis will serve as his campaign
treasurer. Kleis previously served as Administrative Assistant for
former Speaker of the Iowa House, Christopher Rants. In a press
release, Gibbons said, "Our campaign is off to a great start. This
campaign will organize the grassroots and the netroots via the
internet. We believe online communication and social networking is
vital to any campaign organization." Gibbons continued, "Like so many
other Iowans, I am very concerned about the direction Congressman
Boswell is trying to take our country and I am not going to sit on the
sidelines. I have decided to run to the fight and battle on your
behalf for conservative fiscal policies and traditional family
values."

Labels:

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Krusty Konservative: Is Culver about to dump Patty from the ticket?

Excerpted from this post at Krusty Konservative

Is it just me, or has Lt. Governor Patty Judge been acting weird
lately? On November 4th, Judge told the Omaha World Herald, "I am
assuming he [Culver] will run. I think everyone in Iowa would be
surprised if he doesn't run." At the time that Judge made that
comment, the Culver Committee had been running TV ads across the
state. I thought that Judge was being coy about Culver's reelection,
but then she made a strange comment at the Democrats' big Jefferson
Jackson dinner. Judge told the crowd, "People keep ... asking me, 'Are you
running with Chet again?' Well, that's Chet's choice, but I will tell
you that if he wants me on the ticket for another four years, I'm
going to be there." So, what's going on here? Why hasn't Culver asked
Judge to stay on as his Lt. Governor?

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: Braley says constituents support plan for Illinois prison

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Representative Bruce Braley has rejected Republican critics of a
proposal to transfer some prisoners from Guantanamo Bay to the Thomson
Correctional Center, just across the Mississippi River from Clinton. ...
Iowa Republicans don't appear ready to stop stoking fears about
terrorists coming to a prison near you. State GOP chairman Matt
Strawn's November 20 e-mail blast slammed Braley, along with
Representatives Leonard Boswell and Dave Loebsack. ... I gather that
Republicans are confident this is a winning issue for them, but is
there any evidence that Iowans are afraid to have prisoners moved to a
maximum-security facility on the other side of the Mississippi? John
Carlson, the Des Moines Register's conservative columnist, went to
Clinton last week and found broad support for the plan.

Labels:

TPMMuckraker: Shadowy GOP-linked group plans barrage of 2010 robo-calls

Excerpted from this post at TPMMuckraker

A shadowy conservative group with ties to the operatives behind a host
of GOP dirty tricks is working to undermine state restrictions on
political robo-calls, as it gears up to unleash a barrage of such
calls in 2010 races. Last month, American Future Fund Political Action
(AFFPA) informed the FEC that it's planning robo-calls in
congressional races. Jason Torchinsky, a lawyer for AFFPA, wrote that
the group "wishes to distribute pre-recorded telephone calls ... as
part of a nationwide program of political outreach." The calls, wrote
Torchinsky, "will expressly advocate the election or defeat of one or
more clearly identified candidates for Federal office." AFFPA was
asking the FEC for an advisory opinion on whether state laws
restricting robo-calls should apply, or whether, as AFFPA argues,
they're pre-empted by a less restrictive federal law that sought to
standardize the regulation of robo-calls.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009

The Iowa Republican: Is Deace's PSA parody Branstad's "Katie Couric moment" voters will remember?

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Ever have a bad 80's tune stay stuck in your head that you cannot get
rid of? I still have the Terry Branstad staggering sound bite playing
in my head from the RPI event... Quick! Somebody else say something
silly or stupid just so I can think of something else. ... Personally
it's been a big month in Iowa politics with Ron Paul's recent visit, a
trip to the Chuck Norris Ranch, Tim Pawlenty visiting, the tea party
convention and the Mike Huckabee book signing. With all these events
its Terry Branstad's gaffe that I keep thinking about. I keep
assessing his loss of words when attempting to prove his prowess and
the damage of such a dropped bomb. Deace's public service announcement
parody reminds me...

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: We have a candidate in the fourth district

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

At the Jefferson-Jackson dinner on Saturday I was pleased to meet Bill
Maske of Truro (Madison County), who is running against Representative
Tom Latham in Iowa's fourth Congressional district. I don't know
whether there will be a contested Democratic primary; I didn't see
stickers or campaign literature for any other Democrat looking at this
race. ... Latham is generally considered a safe incumbent after
beating Becky Greenwald last year by 20 points in a district Barack
Obama won. Still, it will be important to have a Democrat out there
highlighting Latham's bad votes. In 2012, Latham will either be thrown
into the same district as Steve King or, more likely, will have to run
in a new third district containing Polk County. We can't afford to
leave him unchallenged next year.

Labels:

Herd on the Hill: Making health care accessible, affordable, and portable

Excerpted from this post at Herd on the Hill

We are offering a set of bold, state-based initiatives to make health care more accessible, affordable, and portable. Health care reform solutions need not come from Washington, DC. In fact, the best reforms are often those developed closest to the people. Iowans do not need to wait for national politicians to act. Instead, they can join with us in pursuit of a set of common sense Iowa Health Care Initiatives and solve Iowa problems with Iowa solutions. ... As with any product or service, the more information consumers can access to compare the costs and quality of that product or service, the lower the cost and the higher the quality of the products and services they ultimately consume.

Labels: ,

John Deeth Blog: Scheffler backs GOP purity test

Excerpted from this post at John Deeth Blog

Back in the early days of teh interwebs, various versions of "the Purity Test" floated about. It was scored like golf; the lower the score, the less "pure" you were and vice versa. Some of the questions on the deluxe 500 question version wend beyond funny into the zone of the disturbing, but it was all meant in good clean (well, dirty) fun. Of course, the modern GOP would have no part of such a purity test, at least outside the Minneapolis airport bathroom. But a number of members of the Republican National Committee, including Iowa's own Steve Scheffler, are backing a ten question Purity test with a real cost: get more than three wrong and they cut off the $. Apparantly the lessons of New York 23 are not yet learned. Here's the test.

Labels:

Monday, November 23, 2009

Bleeding Heartland: What's unfair to residents of coal-dependent states?

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Politicians in both parties have complained that proposed federal
climate change bills are "unfair" to Midwestern states, which rely
largely on coal to generate electricity. Utility companies and
corporate groups have tried to reinvent themselves as defenders of the
public interest against those who would unjustly "punish" consumers
living in coal-dependent states. Physicians for Social Responsibility
released a report this week on "Coal's Assault on Human Health." This
report should be required reading for all members of Congress,
especially Senator Tom Harkin and other Democrats who have demanded
more subsidies for coal-burning utilities in the climate-change bill.
... It's clear that coal-fired power plants extract a huge toll on
public health. Creating financial incentives to move away from coal as
a source of electricity isn't "unfair," especially since low-income
Americans could receive increased subsidies for utility bills.

The Iowa Republican: Rants -- Iowa's perfect storm: Property taxes...

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Iowa taxpayers, along with local and state governments, are facing the
perfect storm of lack of business development, an escalating tax
burden, and a school funding crisis brought on by years of neglect and
bad fiscal discipline in Terrace Hill. Where do those three storm
clouds intersect? Property taxes, property taxes, property taxes.
Storm Cloud #1 – Obstacle to Business Development. Iowa's commercial
property tax burden is the third highest in the country. Those in the
industrial classification are in the top ten. Residential owners are
in the top fifteen. If you take the time to talk to business owners,
big or small, they'll tell you that property taxes are the key
obstacle to expansion. Ask a developer or builder, and they'll tell
you that Iowa's property taxes per square foot of built out space make
it uncompetitive to build and lease property compared to other states.

Labels: ,

Iowa Progress: Kent Sorenson accepts help from communist sympathizers?

Excerpted from this post at Iowa Progress

Kent Sorenson, who is running against Staci Appel in Senate District
37, is touting that he had Ron Paul appear at a fundraiser. But what
he didn’t mention is Ron Paul thinks that fall of the Berlin Wall was
a bad thing. Two weeks ago, Ron Paul voted against a resolution that
celebrated the fall of the Berlin Wall and the freedom of Central and
Eastern Europe from Soviet domination. He was the only person in
Congress to find this to be a bad thing. In addition, mere minutes
before that vote, Paul also voted against an expression of support for
Chinese human rights activists. It seems strange that Kent Sorenson, a
man supposedly running for office in the name of liberty, is accepting
support from someone who is consistently expressing support for
totalitarian Communist regimes that suppressed freedom, human rights
and the practice of Christianity.

Friday, November 20, 2009

Bleeding Heartland: Zaun also will run against Boswell

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Next spring, Iowa's third Congressional district will see its first
competitive Republican primary in some time. State Senator Brad Zaun
of Urbandale told CQ Politics today that he plans to run against
seven-term incumbent Representative Leonard Boswell. Zaun said he will
formally announce his candidacy sometime after December 1.
Earlier today, The Iowa Republican blog reported that former Iowa
State wrestling coach Jim Gibbons is quitting his job at Wells Fargo
to run for Congress against Boswell. One of the previously announced
candidates, Dave Funk of Runnells, indicated in this comment thread
that he will stay in the race. Until this week, Funk and Pat Bertroche
of Clive were the only confirmed Republican candidates against
Boswell. Zaun was just re-elected to the Iowa Senate in 2008, so he
won't have to give up his seat in the upper chamber if he loses the
GOP primary or the general election.

Labels:

The Iowa Republican: Roxanne and her special interests

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

The month of November has been incredibly busy. With countless big
news stories and major events taking place all over the state, it has
been difficult to cover everything that has gone on. There have been a
number of stories that need to be written. Some of these issues and
events may still become stories on their own, but I feel like I'm
getting a little backed up. So, before I forget where I've been this
month, I figured I needed to at least mention them before my memory
fails me. I hope you will indulge me with an opportunity to clear my
desk by having a couple clean-up articles today. ... Roxanne Conlin
claims in her "announcement" YouTube video that, "Taking on the
special interests has been the cause of my life." Then, twelve seconds
later, she is pictured with Jeremy Lewis, who is the Development
Director for One Iowa.

Labels:

Herd on the Hill: Restoring the fiscal balance: Iowa family budget initiatives

Excerpted from this post at Herd on the Hill

We have real solutions to help solve Iowa's budget crisis and protect
the very family budgets that will be at risk if bold action is not
taken quickly. Constitutional Limit on State Spending: We will propose
and support an amendment to the Iowa Constitution to limit state
spending to no more than 99% of state revenue. The current budget
limitation law doesn't work and, just last year, the legislature
authorized nearly 70 loopholes in the current law to allow their
outrageous spending increases. Only an amendment to the Iowa
Constitution is immune from legislative loopholes. Limiting spending
to 99% of revenue ensures a balanced budget and the annual deposit of
money into a rainy day fund. In the meantime, we pledge to pass NO
budgets that exceed the 99% limit. Iowa families must live within
their means--Iowa state government should be no different.

Thursday, November 19, 2009

Bleeding Heartland: The shrinking Republican tent

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Iowa's second Congressional district is the most Democratic-leaning of
our five districts. It has a partisan voting index of D+7, which means
that in any given year, we would expect this district to vote about 7
point more Democratic than the country as a whole. In 2008, Dave
Loebsack won re-election in IA-02 with about 57 percent of the vote
against Mariannette Miller-Meeks, who couldn't crack 40 percent. Today
Republican blogger Craig Robinson previews the GOP primary to take on
Loebsack. His piece is a good reminder of how small the Republican
tent has become in a district once represented by Jim Leach. ... Let's
review a few salient facts. The most Democratic-leaning House district
held by a Republican is Louisiana's second (D+25), but Joseph Cao won
that seat primarily because of incumbent William Jefferson's massive
corruption.

Labels: ,

The Iowa Republican: Gibbons prepares to take on Boswell in Iowa's 3rd CD

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Former Iowa State wrestling Coach Jim Gibbons wants to be the third
district's next member of Congress. Gibbons brings the unique
perspective of an athlete, coach, father, husband, and financial
advisor to his congressional campaign. However, after talking with him
for a couple of hours yesterday afternoon, it is clear that Gibbons'
drive, determination, and competitive nature are what will set him
apart from Congressman Boswell should he win the Republican nomination
next June. Gibbons attributes his drive, determination, and work ethic
to his father, who taught him to never accept defeat. "In order to
succeed, you must a have a goal and a plan that allows you to achieve
it," Gibbons told TheIowaRepublican.com. At a young age, Jim Gibbons
found success. At Ames High School, he won three state titles. At Iowa
State University, he was a three-time All-American and won a national
championship during his junior year.

Labels: ,

Price of Politics, Etc.: Purple matters

Excerpted from this post at Price of Politics, Etc.

We had a fascinating, albeit sad, conversation on "Purple Matters"
last night. ... So much of everyone's focus is on money right now. And
rightfully so, as we remain in the middle of this Great Recession. As
state leaders keep looking for ways to cut expenses to make the
numbers work, Iowans for Tax Relief came up with an idea. President Ed
Failor, Jr. joined us to share it. He wants to merge all three state
university systems into one. The University of Northern Iowa, Iowa
State and the University of Iowa would still exist in their three
separate locations but they would have one president, for example.
Failor said other states like Minnesota and Wisconsin have just one
system and save tens of millions of dollars doing that.

Labels:

Wednesday, November 18, 2009

The Iowa Republican: An early look at the 2nd CD Republican primary

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

In most cases, it's impossible to accurately predict how political
candidates stack up against each other in a primary or general
election. For example, even though both Bob Vander Plaats and former
Governor Terry Branstad have run for statewide office numerous times,
it's nearly impossible to predict how they will matchup against one
another in counties across the state. We can make some general
observations, like Vander Plaats will probably do well in northwest
Iowa and Governor Branstad will perform well in central Iowa, but
those are just assumptions. We will have to wait until the June
primary to see whether all of those assumptions will hold true or not.
The Republican primary in Iowa's second congressional district is
different.

Labels:

Campaign Diaries: Republicans receive encouraging poll results from Arkansas, Iowa

Excerpted from this post at Campaign Diaries

We're back to the 80s in Iowa: Branstad and Grassley hold big leads.
As soon as former Iowa Governor Terry Branstad signaled he would seek
to regain his old job, we knew that Chet Culver would be one of the
cycle's most endangered incumbents. And a new Des Moines Register poll
suggests the race might not even be competitive: Branstad leads by a
stunning 24% margin - 57% to 33%. Despite the fact that his approval
rating is not dismal (40-49) and his favorability rating remains
positive (47-46), Culver finds himself in David Paterson-territory!
(This survey, conducted by Selzer & Co., is one of the country's most
reputable polls so it's hard to dismiss these results - especially
since Rasmussen found Culver facing just as large a deficit earlier
this fall.)

Labels: ,

Blog for Iowa: Meet Francis Thicke - Progressive Democrat for Iowa agriculture secretary

Excerpted from this post at Blog for Iowa

I've known Francis Thicke and his wife, Susan, for over 30 years, and I can testify that he is the real deal. Francis is running for Agriculture Secretary because he has a sincere impulse to engage in public service for the sake of improving Iowa. Interviewing Francis gave me a chance to experience his brilliant grasp of complex, pressing issues. ... (T)ell us about that transition from working for government to going back to private farming. Thicke: It was an interesting transition, Jay. As a matter of fact, my colleagues at USDA rolled their eyes and wondered out loud how somebody who worked for USDA as a bureaucrat could actually go farm, and some of them were taking bets about how long I'd make it.

Labels:

Tuesday, November 17, 2009

Bleeding Heartland: Pull the plug on the climate change bill

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Few problems require federal action more urgently than global warming.
I admire the members of Congress who have been trying to address this
issue. House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Henry Waxman tried
to get the best deal he could. Senator John Kerry has tried to keep
things moving in the upper chamber. Senator Lindsey Graham is getting
tons of grief from fellow Republicans because he admits that climate
change is a problem. I want to support these people and their efforts
to get a bill on the president's desk. Unfortunately, the time has
come to accept that Congress is too influenced by corporate interests
to deal with climate change in any serious way. Pretending to fight
global warming won't solve the problem and may even be
counter-productive.

Labels:

Iowa Independent: Harkin, 13 other Dems request more protection for coal power in energy bill

Excerpted from this post at Iowa Independent

The push is on to dilute the climate change bills moving through
Congress, and it's not coming only from conservatives. Mother Jones'
Kate Sheppard reports today that 14 Senate Democrats, including U.S.
Sen. Tom Harkin, are urging their leadership to amend the proposal to
grant more free polluting permits to the coal-burning utilities that
emit the most greenhouse gases. In a letter to Senate Democratic
leaders, the lawmakers argue that the current formula, which allots
permits based half on emissions and half on sales, is unfair to the
higher-emitting utilities (i.e., those that burn coal).

Labels:

The Iowa Republican: New economic development strategy -- Move terrorists next door

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

For almost ten years, a brand new, state of the art, maximum security
prison located between Thomson and Savannah, Illinois has remained
largely empty. The state of Illinois built the facility to replace one
of its aging maximum security prisons. After its construction, the
state lacked the resources to open and operate the facility.
Currently, only the 200-bed minimum-security unit is open. The 1600
cell maximum security prison remains empty. So instead of housing the
state's most dangerous criminals, the state heats and cools the
building, opens and shuts the cell doors, and flushes the toilets once
a week. In 2004, those activities cost the state $800,000 a year.

Hawkeye Review: Fong: "Leave no county behind"

Excerpted from this post at Hawkeye Review

I went to Ringgold County to see how small-town Iowa can thrive.
Iowa's small towns are pillars in my economic development plan and my
2020 Vision plan for Iowa. As Governor, I'd fight relentlessly for
their future. Redding, Iowa is barely four miles from Missouri, and
might as well be a million miles from the power lunches and elite
circles of the big city. Common sense and homegrown Iowa values are
the core of people's character. Last Wednesday, Tracee and Steve Knapp
were gracious hosts for the evening house party, after being my tour
guides through Mount Ayr in the afternoon. ... Mount Ayr, the county
seat of Ringgold County, the second smallest population county in
Iowa, will make it. If state leadership in Des Moines will stop
getting in the way, that is.

Labels:

Monday, November 16, 2009

The Iowa Republican: Rants accuses Branstad of wanting to raise the gas tax

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

State Representative Chris Rants accused former Governor Terry
Branstad of wanting to raise the state's gas tax Saturday night. Rants
made the accusation at a Dubuque County Republican Party event. Rants
began his five minute speech by saying that he had had a difficult
day. Rants was in Des Moines that morning at an event for State
Representative Kent Sorenson and then he headed for Republican events
in Decorah and Dubuque. Rants admitted that he was struggling to
decide whether or not he should give his usual speech about property
taxes. He then informed the crowd that he jettisoned that speech so he
could talk to them about what happened to the gubernatorial candidates
in Decorah earlier that afternoon.

Labels: ,

Bleeding Heartland: National Republicans unlikely to spend heavily against Boswell

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Republicans are trying to recruit a strong challenger against
Congressman Leonard Boswell, and by the end of the year State Senator
Brad Zaun, former Iowa GOP head Mike Mahaffey, or perhaps some other
prominent figure will throw his hat in the ring. However, I continue
to believe that Iowa's third Congressional district will not be a
close contest next year, and I'll explain why after the jump. ... When
Republicans ran hard against Boswell in 2002, 2004 and 2006, the
National Republican Congressional Committee made significant
independent expenditures in the district. I can't see that happening
next year, not with so many more promising targets for House
Republicans.

Labels:

Politically Speaking: Sioux City native Munger runs for governor (in Arizona)

Excerpted from this post at Politically Speaking

Got a tip (thanks, Cliff Tufty) of a Sioux City native running for
major political office, as 1965 Central High graduate John Munger is
running for governor in Arizona. Munger has firm roots in Republican
Party politics, as his father, Robert P. Munger, served in the Iowa
House and Senate. He got a start in politics serving as an intern for
former Iowa 6th District Congressman Wiley Mayne of Sioux City in
1967, prior to getting a degree from Stanford University. Apparently,
he's been a southwest U.S. guy ever since. He formed a law firm with
brother Clark Munger in Tucson in 1977, then gained some impressive
positions as Arizona Republican Party Chairman (in 1983) and as a
member of the Republican National Committee.

Friday, November 13, 2009

Iowa Independent: Grassley qruestions whether insuance mandate violates 10th Amendment

Excerpted from this post at Iowa Independent

Even if Democrats manage to pass health reform legislation, if it
contains an individual mandate it could prove unconstitutional, U.S.
Sen. Chuck Grassley said Thursday. During an interview with KAYL radio
in Storm Lake and the Marshalltown Times Republican, Grassley said
that even though he's never studied law and is not a constitutional
expert, he still believes mandating insurance coverage could be a
violation of the 10th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. "[The 10th
Amendment] says something like anything that's not specifically
delegated to the federal government is reserved to the states and the
people thereof -- all those rights and powers," Grassley said, later
adding: "So states, if they want to mandate you buy something, they
can do it. But that doesn't give the federal government the right to
do it."

Labels: ,

The Iowa Republican: Republican secretary of state primary looms

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Up and down the ballot, Republicans have favorable matchups in next
fall's general elections. The top of Republican ballot will feature
U.S. Senator Chuck Grassley and a gubernatorial candidate who will
emerge from a hard fought primary to face the unpopular and weak
incumbent governor, Chet Culver. While the gubernatorial primary
captures the most attention across the state, Republicans will have
healthy primaries in a number of races. Three-way primaries are likely
in Iowa's first and second congressional districts. Another race which
could have a three candidate primary is the Republican primary for
Secretary of State. Currently two candidates have been traveling to
events around the state. Council Bluffs City Councilman Matt Schultz
announced his candidacy a couple of weeks ago, and former State
Representative George Eichhorn is set to formally announce his
candidacy later today.

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: Iowa gets good marks in report on state budget problems

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Iowa has relatively good money-management practices and is among the
states "least like California" in terms of budget problems, according
to a report released yesterday by the Pew Center on the States. ...
Scanning the scorecard, I noticed that only one state has a better
score overall than Iowa. The size of Iowa's budget gap (as a
percentage of total spending) ranks 15th. Only three states had a
smaller change in the unemployment rate than Iowa. Only seven states
had a lower foreclosure rate. We were among eight states that received
a B+ grade for money-management practices (only five states received
an A or A- in that category). Republicans can complain about so-called
fiscal mismanagement by Governor Chet Culver and the
Democratic-controlled legislature, but compared to many other states,
Iowa is weathering this challenging economy well.

Labels:

Essential Estrogen: Iowa women, let's give Joy Corning a big round of applause

Excerpted from this post at Essential Estrogen

Some Iowa households received an automated phone call this week that
featured the familiar voice of former Lt. Gov. Joy Corning: In the
call, which is paid for by One Iowa, Corning reminds Iowans of the
state's history of being open-minded and fair, and requests that other
residents join her in ensuring that the civil rights of all are
protected, and that the state "continues to move forward as a leader
in fairness and equality." Corning, an Iowa native, has a long
political history in this state and has been a role model for many
women. She served as a senator in the state legislature, the first
woman ever elected to serve in that chamber, representing a district
in Black Hawk County. She was the president of the Cedar Falls School
Board. She was also the director of the Iowa Housing Finance Authority
during the early 1980s.

Labels:

Thursday, November 12, 2009

On the Campaign Trail with Ed Tibbetts: Stewart won't seek re-election

Excerpted from this post at On the Campaign Trail with Ed Tibbetts

Iowa Sen. Roger Stewart, D-Preston, said this morning he won't seek
re-election next year. First elected in 2002, Stewart said he'd
planned on two terms and now will bow out. "It's not something that
came overnight," he said. Stewart, who is 78, says he'll keep busy at
a local bank and on his son's farm. He lists expansion of health care,
raising the minimum wage and balancing budgets as accomplishments.
There probably will be a number of suitors for the seat, which
includes the city of Clinton and parts of Clinton, Jackson and Dubuque
counties.

Labels:

The Iowa Republican: With friends like these, who needs enemies?

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Former Iowa Lt. Governor Joy Corning has inserted herself right into
the middle of the Republican primary for governor. Corning served as
Iowa's Lt. Governor under Terry Branstad during the final two terms of
his administration. Corning, a supporter of abortion rights and
homosexual marriage, recently recorded an auto-call for One Iowa, a
gay marriage group that received thousands of dollars from a gay Des
Moines couple who defrauded Aviva USA of nearly six million dollars.
Corning's auto calls for One Iowa were sent to Republicans who live in
Black Hawk County earlier this week. TheIowaRepublican.com learned
about the calls on Tuesday night and contacted Carolyn Jenison, the
Executive Director of One Iowa, to confirm that the Corning calls took
place. Jenisen didn't respond.

Labels: ,

Bleeding Heartland: Republicans trying to have it both ways on I-JOBS

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Attacking Governor Chet Culver's I-JOBS infrastructure bonding
initiative continues to be a staple of Republican Party rhetoric. I've
written about the GOP's misleading talking points before, but State
Representative Chris Rants added a new twist at last night's
fundraising dinner in Scott County. Not long ago, Rants altered his
stump speech to complain about Sergeant Bluff receiving an I-JOBS
grant while Culver's recent across-the-board budget cuts will cost the
community a larger amount. Speaking to a crowd of 300 in Bettendorf,
Rants put a local spin on this story ... What Rants glosses over is
that without I-JOBS, unmet needs for infrastructure improvements would
be even greater. The I-JOBS program includes $118.5 million for flood
prevention and reconstructing buildings in communities affected by
last year's flooding. But requests for that portion of the I-JOBS
money totaled $333.6 million.

Labels:

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Krusty Konservative: Rogue is a good name for it

Excerpted from this post at Krusty Konservative

Sarah Palin is actually headed to Iowa. Palin will be in Sioux City on
December 6th at the Barnes and Noble book store to promote her new
book Going Rogue. Palin's Iowa stop will garner a ton of attention,
but she will not have the type of impact that she would have had if
she combined the book signing stop with an actual political event.
Palin also has some stiff competition when it comes to selling books
in Iowa. Mike Huckabee was just in the state selling his Christmas
book. It's the second time he has come to the state that launched his
presidential campaign to sell a new book. It's been a good strategy,
at one stop more than a thousand people waited in line to meet the
author, Fox News personality, and potential presidential candidate.

Labels:

Essential Estrogen: Stupak-Pitts Amendment: What you can do today

Excerpted from this post at Essential Estrogen

One of the most difficult things about writing this blog is the fact
that I'm not just providing news, but co-opting news with opinion. As
a long-term reporter who has had "just the facts" forever pushed into
my brain function, it's difficult to come to the keyboard with the
dual purpose of providing factual information and to issue a call to
action based on that information. But, as I told the women gathered in
Sioux City this weekend, there are times we have to step outside of
our comfort zones in order to stand up for things that we believe in
or to right a wrong. While I drove across Iowa on Saturday, members of
the U.S. House of Representatives voted on an unprecedented health
care reform bill. The good and bad news is all rolled up in one
sentence: It passed.

Labels:

On the Campaign Trail with Ed Tibbetts: Paustian to make another bid against Gayman

Excerpted from this post at On the Campaign Trail with Ed Tibbetts

I hadn't planned on blogging tonight's Scott County GOP fundraiser,
but here's a bit of local political news: Ross Paustian, the Walcott
farmer who lost a high-profile race to state Rep. Elesha Gayman,
D-Davenport, is going to give it another go, according to Brian
Kennedy, who is the emcee at the dinner. You may recall the
Paustian/Gayman race last year turned nasty toward the end. We'll see
if there's a repeat next year.

Labels:

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Essential Estrogen: It's official: Roxanne Conlin is running for U.S. Senate

Excerpted from this post at Essential Estrogen

Roxanne Conlin was the first woman in Iowa history to serve as a U.S.
Attorney, and now she is poised to give Iowa woman another first.
Conlin wants to be the first Iowa woman elected to serve in Congress.
In order to complete that task, she'll first have to battle in a
Democratic Primary against at least three other contenders. Then
she'll need to take on Chuck Grassley, who has served Iowans in the
U.S. Senate for nearly three decades, but has recently seen his worth
decline in the eyes of some voters. Grassley is probably most known
nationally, at least of late, for his political maneuvering in terms
of health care reform. And it also safe to say that such incidents,
which can only be described as bad-faith negotiations on Grassley's
part, raised a few eyebrows among residents of the Hawkeye State who
would have previously summed up Grassley as more of a straight
shooter.

Labels: ,

The Iowa Republican: GOP gubernatorial primary begins to take shape

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Saturday's Republican Party of Iowa fall fundraiser provided the first
opportunity to see all six Republican gubernatorial candidates share
the same stage and make their case to the assembled audience. While
former governor Terry Branstad has been in the race for almost a month
now, this was the first time he has joined the other candidates at an
event. By now, you have probably read various media accounts of the
event. Branstad's speech was good on content, but his delivery was
lackluster to say the least. Branstad's primary opponents took the
stage without prepared remarks, but he was scripted, and it was
obvious that he was not prepared to deliver the remarks as his
campaign would have hoped.

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: Branstad underwhelms and other highlights from the GOP fundraiser

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Minnesota Governor Tim Pawlenty headlined the Republican Party of
Iowa's fall fundraising dinner on Saturday night, but I was more
interested in the remarks by Republican candidates for governor. O.Kay
Henderson and Craig Robinson live-blogged the proceedings, and the
video is available at C-SPAN's site. Former Governor Terry Branstad
wasn't at the top of his game, stumbling at times, reading from notes
and messing up his applause lines. Kathie Obradovich observed, "The
audience of about 500 at the Republican Party of Iowa's "Leadership
for Iowa" dinner was polite. But there was no sense of excitement for
the candidate who many believe is the favorite for the nomination."
... State Senator Jerry Behn was first up, and he still looks like a
candidate for lieutenant governor to me. He wants to create jobs, get
back to basics in education, and remove the Supreme Court justices who
cleared the way for same-sex marriage in Iowa. What makes him
different from the other Republicans in this race?

Labels:

Monday, November 09, 2009

Krusty Konservative: My free advice to Terry Branstad

Excerpted from this post at Krusty Konservative

My good friend Kathie Obradovich recently wrote an article in which
she calls on Terry Branstad to apologize for comments he made about
blind people. Her article was spawned by the Iowa Democratic Party
Chairman Mike Kiernan's press release asking Branstad to apologize. In
a private meeting a week ago, Branstad said that the commission of the
blind didn't get cut back in the day because legislators couldn't deal
with the tap-tap-tap of the white canes. As you know I can at times be
a little insensitive, but I find the remarks to be kinda funny. Is
what Branstad said really offensive to blind people? Well guess what,
the spokesperson for the commission of the blind that it was a
complement to their organization's effectiveness. He did not demand an
apology at all.

Labels:

Price of Politics, Etc.: Union deal?

Excerpted from this post at Price of Politics, Etc.

Last Wednesday, Governor Chet Culver said he "expected" to hear from
state unions by today on whether they would agree to re-negotiate
contracts to save jobs of state workers. This was his quote,
"Unfortunately, we do not have an endless amount of time in which to
reach an agreement and to have it ratified by each respective union. I
expect to know by Friday, November 6, whether we will move forward in
discussions with the unions or implement the layoff plans." Earlier
this week, Culver's spokesman said today was only a "goal". The office
did not say today whether the unions made the "goal". Apparently, the
governor has returned to the state. The office sent out a release late
this afternoon to say Culver would be in Spencer tonight for a
pheasant hunt.

Labels: ,

Bleeding Heartland: McKinley stops pretending to run for governor

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Paul McKinley dropped out of the governor's race today to focus on
next year's Iowa Senate elections. His move made sense, because the
Iowa Senate Republican caucus has never been smaller than the current
18 members. With 19 Senate Democrats and only 6 Republicans up for
re-election in 2010, the GOP is almost bound to make some gains. My
question is, why did McKinley wait so long to make this announcement?
Although he promised in July to "aggressively explore" a gubernatorial
campaign, McKinley failed to turn up in most places you'd expect to
find potential Republican candidates. In fact, Craig Robinson wrote
last month, "McKinley's indecisiveness since announcing his
gubernatorial campaign hasn't just sunk any aspirations he may have
for higher office in the future, but it might also have impacted his
effectiveness as the Senate Republicans' chief fundraiser, recruiter,
and strategist."

Labels:

Friday, November 06, 2009

Politically Speaking: Heat rising on health care reform

Excerpted from this post at Politically Speaking

Federal health care reform talks have achieved critical mass, as the
end of this week will be a key time to see whether reform moves
forward. The U.S. House could vote on a measure Saturday, and today
some local chapters of the American Association of Retired People are
holding press conferences to talk about support for the House bill.
That will happen in a few minutes in Des Moines with Iowa AARP talking
about advocacy efforts. On the flip side, at noon Republicans like
Iowa 5th District Congressman Steve King and Minnesota Congresswoman
Michele Bachmann will follow through with a press event called a
"house call" on the east steps of the Capitol in Washington to beat
back reform. Two days ago King and other reform critics called on
Americans to "fill the streets of Washington and opposed the (House
Speaker Nancy) Pelosi health care bill."

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: Another day, another lie from Steve King

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Conservative activists gathered in Washington yesterday to protest
Democratic-backed health care reform proposals. As usual,
right-wingers are completely wrong about the substance of the bills,
crying "socialism" when the real problem is not enough
government-backed competition for private insurers. Former House
Majority Leader Dick Armey, a key figure in the "tea party" movement,
claims to believe that "The largest empirical problem we have in
health care today is too many people are too overinsured." Anyway,
when ill-informed right-wingers are causing a spectacle inside the
beltway, you can count on finding Representative Steve King (IA-05)
nearby. Hey, it's been almost three weeks since national media last
paid attention to his unfounded allegations. So King gets on MSNBC
yesterday and falsely claims that the House Democrats' bill would
cancel every private insurance contract in America. You can watch the
clip on the Iowa Democratic Party's site.

Labels: ,

Krusty Konservative: Clueless: Is Patty Judge unaware that Chet is running campaign ads?

Excerpted from this post at Krusty Konservative

If you thought that Governor Culver was clueless, wait till you read
what Lt. Governor Patty Judge told the Omaha World Herald. No
timetable has been established for when -- or if -- Iowa Gov. Chet
Culver announces a re-election campaign, Lt. Gov. Patty Judge said
Wednesday. "I am assuming he will run," Judge said while visiting
Council Bluffs. "I think everyone in Iowa would be surprised if he
doesn't run. We haven't set a timetable yet." Now Patty, don't tease
me and get my hopes up that Chet could call it quits. I think most of
us assume that he is running for reelection because he is running
campaign ads on TV. ... In Culver's latest ad, it shows the words
"Culver Deserves Credit," but credit for what? I looked up the article
and found that Culver deserves credit for working with Republican
Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey. Read the article, it's mostly
about Northey not Culver.

Labels:

Thursday, November 05, 2009

The Iowa Republican: Iowa Republicans targeting Leonard Boswell?

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

About a week ago, CQ Politics downgraded its rating for Iowa's third
congressional district race from Likely Democratic to Safe Democratic.
The reason for the switch in the rating is because CQ Politics
believes Iowa Republicans have failed to put forth a strong opponent
against Democrat incumbent Leonard Boswell. "The Republicans would
have a good shot at defeating seven-term Rep. Boswell if they fielded
a strong candidate. They last did that in 2006, a generally terrible
year for the GOP nationally, when state Sen. Jeff Lamberti held
Boswell to 52 percent, his lowest re-election vote share ever. But in
2008, against a little-known and underfunded Republican, Boswell won
more convincingly. His 56 percent wasn't exactly a landslide, but it
wasn't bad for a traditional swing district -- which includes
Democratic-leaning Des Moines along with more conservative rural areas
-- where the congressman outran presidential nominee Barack Obama by 2
points."

Labels: ,

Politically Speaking: Iowa Democrats have huge registration lead

Excerpted from this post at Politically Speaking

A year ago tonight, the votes were counted and Barack Obama won the
presidency and Democrats strengthened their holds in the two federal
chambers. Republicans nationally and in Iowa licked their wounds, then
looked ahead. State Rep. Chris Rants, R-Sioux City, showing me a host
of vote totals from various statehouse races on his laptop, pointed to
where some of the statehouse elections could have turned for the GOP
with not too many more votes. Rants said Republicans needed to do the
grunt work of registering more voters to the party, then turning them
out. So are Republicans cutting into the voter registration lead of
Democrats? From the early November voter registration totals from the
Iowa Secretary of State office, Dems still are sitting on a very
substantial lead, one of well over 100,000 people.

Labels:

Iowa Defense Alliance: Reason #31 why marriage is a winning Issue

Excerpted from this post at Iowa Defense Alliance

Maine is reason #31 why marriage is a winning issue and the thirty
other reasons are the other states who have had the definition of
marriage being between on man and one woman upheld by the electorate.
Traditional marriage has never lost on the ballot ... never ... not
even in the liberal northeast ... not anywhere in this Obamanation.
Traditional marriage even prevailed when his name was at the top of
the ticket last November. What is interesting about the Maine vote,
however, is that the voters gave the middle finger to the very people
they elected to represent them. The Maine legislature imposed a law
providing gay marriage and yesterday the people spoke and rejected
that law. (Maine doesn't know how lucky they are to actually have
their elected officials make the gay marriage law instead of the
courts unconstitutionally doing it or to have their elected officials
actually do something about marriage-even if it was the wrong
decision. We don't have that luxury in Iowa.)

Labels:

Iowa Independent: Southern justice organization slams Rose's U.S. attorney nomination

Excerpted from this post at Iowa Independent

If confirmed by the U.S. Senate, Stephanie Rose will become the second
woman in history to serve as a U.S. Attorney in Iowa, and the first to
hold the post in the Northern District. A social justice organization
that has primarily been active in Louisiana and Texas has taken a
stand against the woman nominated to be the next U.S. attorney for the
Northern District of Iowa. Friends of Justice, a nonprofit organized
in the wake of a 1999 Tulia drug sting in Texas, issued a statement
Wednesday describing the nomination of Stephanie Rose for U.S.
attorney as "just plain wrong." Rose, who has worked in the office
since 1997 and currently serves as the deputy criminal chief, is
tainted, according to the organization, due to her involvement in the
prosecutions of hundreds of immigrants following a massive raid of the
Agriprocessors meatpacking plant in Postville in 2008.

Wednesday, November 04, 2009

Hawkeye Review: Unaffiliated voters roar...and Republicans win

Excerpted from this post at Hawkeye Review

I wouldn't call yesterday a Republican stampede, but there's no doubt
it was certainly a banner day for the GOP. Now that the smoke has
cleared the analysis begins there's no doubt the most impressive
statistic from yesterdays races was the incredible disparity from the
unaffiliated voters. Often called Independents, these voters don't
truly belong to a party and they follow no leader. In a pattern that
was shockingly consistent across the field of races yesterday,
unaffiliated voters broke towards the GOP at a margin of nearly 62% to
38%. These voters confirmed the recent Gallup Poll which clearly
indicates the nation is breaking back towards conservative values. ...
While Virginia, New Jersey and the east coast races received the
lion's share of media last night, there were many down ticket races
across the country that confirmed the resurgence of conservative
values in the shifting electorate. One such race was in Cedar Rapids
with the dominant win by former House Speaker Ron Corbett.

Labels:

The Iowa Republican: As goes Maine, so too, I hope, goes Iowa

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Voters in Maine overturned legislation yesterday that would have
allowed same-sex marriage. Voters rejected same-sex marriage
52 to 47 percent, despite being outspent two-to-one. The saying "as
goes Maine, so goes the nation" might be a predictor for how Iowa
voters would chose if our legislators would give the citizens a chance
to vote on this issue. Instead, the Democrat controlled legislature
gets a lot of its campaign funding from the liberally left, which
supports same-sex marriage. Iowa voters will have a chance in a year
to do some voting that could have an effect on this issue in the
Hawkeye State. We can vote to not retain Iowa Supreme Court judges who
voted for the plaintiffs in Varnum v. Brien. Concerned Iowa voters can
also vote for social conservatives to serve in the House, Senate and
Governor's offices, and turn out those state legislators who have
supported the court's ruling and who have effectively blocked efforts
to bring this matter before the citizens of the state.

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: Culver launches new campaign ad

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

While you're waiting for tonight's election returns, check out the
television commercial Governor Chet Culver's campaign launched today.
Like the commercial Culver ran last month, this ad emphasizes that the
governor cut spending and his own salary in order to balance the state
budget during this recession without raising taxes. I think the ad is
well-crafted in terms of script and visuals, but like Bleeding
Heartland users IowaVoter and dricey, I am concerned when Democrats
rely heavily on Republican anti-tax messaging. Culver may be
reinforcing conservative frames and limiting his future policy options
if he does win re-election. ... Republicans are already blaming
Democrats for the property tax increases many Iowans will experience
next year. Their outrage is hypocritical, because the state cuts
affecting education and local governments would have been far more
severe if not for the federal stimulus bill, which included aid to
state governments.

Labels:

Essential Estrogen: Did you hear? Iowa might soon have another female legislator!

Excerpted from this post at Essential Estrogen

Late Wednesday night, following a special nominating convention, Linn
County committee persons in Cedar Rapids precincts 1 through 11 chose
Kirsten Running-Marquardt as their candidate in the special Iowa House
District 33 race that is scheduled for Nov. 24. Two days later,
Running-Marquardt has issued her first official campaign statement,
pledging to make flood recovery in Cedar Rapids a top priority. "After
the devastating 2008 flood, Cedar Rapids has the opportunity to come
back better than ever and I'm excited to be a part of the future of
Cedar Rapids," Running-Marquardt said in the prepared statement. "Our
community is grateful for the support from the Iowa Legislature for
recovery initiatives like IJOBS, unmet needs assistance and Jumpstart
programs. However, we know there is more work to do and I will fight
for continued support to give flood survivors the help, dignity and
respect they deserve."

Labels:

Tuesday, November 03, 2009

Bleeding Heartland: New Branstad running mate speculation thread

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

It might seem presumptuous to talk about former Governor Terry Branstad's running mate when the guy finished fifth in a Republican straw poll last week, but bear with me. Branstad has work to do with the social conservative wing of the Iowa GOP. Those voters carried him in the 1982 and 1994 Republican primaries, but in those races, he faced more moderate opponents. The current GOP field has no moderates, and Bob Vander Plaats is campaigning against Branstad from the right. Last week Branstad tried to reassure prominent figures on the religious right about his intentions. Conservative blogger Shane Vander Hart attended this meeting and felt it did not go well for Branstad. Mike Demastus had less kind words for the former governor after the meeting. The posts by Vander Hart and Demastus are must-reads, and I'll have more to say about them in the future. The most important things I learned from Vander Hart: 1) Branstad is promising to choose a conservative running mate.

Labels:

The Iowa Republican: Rebound: Can the Scott County GOP help turn the tide for Republicans statewide?

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Just over a decade ago, Republicans held eight of the nine legislative seats in Scott County, today Republicans only control three of those seats. The difficulties that Republicans have recently experienced in Scott County are not confined to one county; it is something that ails Republicans in all of eastern Iowa. Currently, Republicans control only five senate seats and sixteen house seats east of Polk County. If you want to understand why Republicans have lost their majorities, one need to look at what has happened to the state of the Republican Party in eastern Iowa. In January of 2000, there were almost 5,000 more registered Republicans in Scott County than there were registered Democrats. Today, Democrats enjoy a registered voter advantage of 8,622 over Republicans.

Labels:

The Marion Contrarian: Auto-pilot budget increases vs. zero based budgeting? Which approach promotes fiscal responsibility?

Excerpted from this post at The Marion Contrarian

Wednesday's Linn County Board of Supervisors meeting is extremely important. We will be deciding three fundamental issues regarding next year's budget process and I fear I am on the losing end of a "business-as-usual" mentality: 1. What will be the percentage increase in non-bargaining unit employees and management salaries? This decision will affect how millions of tax dollars are spent in "raises" for employees WITHOUT fundamental change to address the long-term problem in classifying employees and their salaries, developing a true merit-based system to employee bonuses or raises, and developing a system to determine what the raise should be if any (the BOS currently will just pick a number that feels and sounds good - seriously, their is no rhyme or reason to it).

Monday, November 02, 2009

The Iowa Republican: Albrecht joins Branstad Campaign

Excerpted from this post at The Iowa Republican

Former governor Terry Branstad has added to his campaign team.
Branstad has hired long-time Republican operative Tim Albrecht to lead
his gubernatorial campaign's communications department. Albrecht, who
most recently served as the American Future Funds communication
director, brings a wealth of campaign and legislative experience to
his new position with Branstad's 2010 gubernatorial campaign. Like
many political operatives in Iowa, Albrecht got his start at a young
age volunteering for a presidential campaign (Pat Buchanan) in advance
of the Iowa caucuses. During the 2000 caucuses, Albrecht organized 33
counties for Steve Forbes in the northwest corner of the state.
Following the 2000 caucuses, Albrecht worked on Dick Johnson's
congressional campaign, Steve Sukup's gubernatorial campaign, and Greg
Ganske's U.S. Senate campaign.

Labels: ,

Politically Speaking: Branstad's quote leaves no doubt

Excerpted from this post at Politically Speaking

Will he run for the 2010 governor spot? Certainly. Here's the key
quote made late yesterday by former Gov. Terry Branstad, after
journeying from Iowa City (after the Hawkeyes defeated Indiana) to
Wilton to speak at a fundraiser for Republican State Rep. Jeff
Kaufmann: "This is a Saturday we'll always remember — the day the
Hawkeyes set a record nine straight wins... and the day I had the
opportunity to re-enter the political fray." Wait, did Branstad in any
way cite the Iowa State football program?

Labels:

Bleeding Heartland: Harkin gives Lieberman something to think about

Excerpted from this post at Bleeding Heartland

Senate HELP Committee Chairman Tom Harkin told reporters yesterday
that he does not expect Senator Joe Lieberman to join a Republican
filibuster to block the health care reform bill. He also hinted that
Lieberman has a lot to lose by sinking this bill. ... In July, Harkin
suggested a new rule for the Senate Democratic caucus: "Every two
years the caucus could have a secret ballot on whether a chairman
should continue, yes or no [...] If the 'no's win, [the chairman's]
out. I've heard it talked about before" ... At the time, Harkin's
comments were widely viewed as a threat against Senate Finance
Committee Chairman Max Baucus. But Lieberman is a more likely target
for demotion if he follows through with his threats. His alleged fears
about health care reform adding to the deficit don't hold water, and
his he plans to campaign for some Republicans in 2010 won't help his
cause with fellow Democrats.

Labels: ,

Price of Politics, Etc.: Steve King for president

Excerpted from this post at Price of Politics, Etc.

Fifth District Republican Congressman Steve King filled us with news
this weekend. Two things headlined his chat with us: an almost tea
party revolt and a run for president. King wants Americans to rush to
Washington, D.C. to stop Congressional Democrats from passing a
government-run public option in the health care reform package. King
said he doesn't believe the numbers are changing and that more
Americans support the public option. He wants Americans to "fill
Washington". And if they can't go there in person, he wants them to
jam the phone lines, email in boxes and talk shows. He isn't asking
people to yell, like some of the most vocal did during town hall
meetings this summer. But he wants them to show their passion to
Congress. And he wants Congress to hear that passion, he said.

Labels:

Mike Schramm
Andy Szal

Contact staff@iowapolitics.com with tips or news items for the blog.

An IowaPolitics.com round-up of excerpts from political blogs around the state.

See samples of IowaPolitics.com subscriber products

Take a no-obligation two-week free trial.

Contact Mike Schramm with questions about subscribing

Powered by Blogger

Site Meter